Blog

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Aug 11, 2018, 4:52 PM
So barefoot for kids is being pushed and shoes are made to look evil. This is our take on it all.
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Feb 24, 2018, 8:31 AM
One of the most common questions we are asked as podiatrists is in relation to kids ‘footwear. “When should my child wear shoes?” and “should they be wearing a supportive shoe or a soft shoe?”
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Jan 18, 2018, 9:05 PM
With back to school often comes offers of podiatry screening. This is a partially copied blog from the Kingston Foot Clinic on their thoughts about podiatry screening.
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Jun 18, 2017, 9:54 AM
Just like adults, kids have different pain thresholds because they also respond based on learned experience and how everyone around them responds when they hurt themselves. These experiences and responses gives them a pain calibration and one of the reasons you see mums and dads giving a sore knee a rub and a kiss and encouraging the child to run back to play. As a health practitioner, you need to work within this framework of learned response.
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Apr 22, 2017, 9:56 AM
Part 1 - Taking a pain history We have all experienced pain as adults. It is different for kids. When they see you and are in pain, it actually may be the first time or the most pain they have experienced.
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Mar 6, 2017, 9:41 PM
The flat foot is one of the most common presentations to health professionals. It is also one of the most controversial treatment. More often than not, while these children may have a slightly flatter foot, they will rarely complain of any pain and can be highly active kids. So the question remains, if we do treat, what exactly are we treating?
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Jan 14, 2017, 1:43 PM
Are you an Henny Penny (aka The SKY IS FALLING), a Lenny Layback or Malcolm in the Middle when it comes to your treatment style?
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Nov 25, 2016, 7:39 AM
By Antoni Caserta P​icking up a leg length discrepancy during assessment isn’t uncommon in a consultation but what should we do about it?
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Mar 3, 2016, 10:17 PM
By Simone Cranage As clinicians we often see the new walkers that often come with the parental concern that “they look awkward, clumsy or unsteady on their feet and they fall over a lot” As a baby becomes confident in their crawling they are learning to move around the environment on their own and are developing a sense of independence.